Faucet Style: Defining Traditional, Transitional, Contemporary, Country

Embarking on a kitchen remodel is both exhilarating and terrifying at the same time. Certainly you have a budget into which you need to fit all the construction, cabinetry, tile, appliances, counter top, and, of course, your kitchen faucet, the jewel of your new room.

When it comes to choosing your faucet, there are a number of factors to consider, including the style that will define your kitchen for years to come. Whether you consult with a designer or you feel pretty confident you can pull your new kitchen together yourself, you’ll need to have a good sense of the overall look you want.

So, what does that mean for your faucet? A lot, actually. There are five primary style definitions that encompass the majority of what homeowners will consider when they tackle a remodel: contemporary, country, modern, traditional, and transitional.


Contemporary: Typically viewed as stark because folks confuse it with modern, contemporary design is really quite bold, veering more toward curves and reflective surfaces than sharp angles and flat finishes. This style is very sleek and can veer toward the industrial.

Here, Kohler pairs the Clairette in vibrant brushed steel with a Neoroc double-basin sink in a more modern shape to create a cohesive blend.


Country (rustic)
: Classic, comfortable, clean, and warm all describe a country style sensibility. Finishes are rustic and evoke a more rural, quiet and simple time – think oil-rubbed bronze or even copper instead of chrome – and functionality is paramount.

This Moen Waterhill bridge faucet is a great example of a country style faucet. The shape of the spout instantly transports you back in time, and the oil-rubbed bronze finish has the perfect patina of a bygone era.


Modern
: A cousin to contemporary, modern is all sharp edges instead of smooth curves. A modern sensibility is more about function and form through the use of geometric angles. Colors can vary, but most typically polished finishes help define a more modern aesthetic.

Here, the Grohe Eurocube is a home cook’s dream because of features like ceramic cartridges and a spot-resistant coating.


Traditional
: Choosing a faucet to fit a traditional kitchen means looking for familiar lines and details the evoke a sense of the past. Traditional faucets can come in almost any finish, but polished chrome seems to be the most popular, though polished brass is making a comeback. Embellishments are few and symmetry is key to a traditional design.

This Delta Cassidy faucet combines the best of traditional styling with modern technology and the growing popularity of single-hole faucets.


Transitional
: Here is where traditional meets modern with straightforward lines that are not as ornate as traditional or as severe as modern. The focus is on comfort and practicality; sharp corners are rounded just enough to take the edge off, and swooping curves are stretched to bring the design up-to-date. Any finish can complement a transitional faucet, making this style truly timeless.

The Brizo Venuto pulldown kitchen faucet pairs well with kitchen sinks of any material and almost any shape, making it a great choice you’ll love for years to come.

 

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *